Featured Exhibit: Pictures of Resistance: The Wartime Photographs of Jewish Partisan Faye Schulman

Virginia Holocaust Museum (VHM) 2000 East Cary Street, Richmond

Born in Poland in 1924, Faye Schulman received her first camera from her brother when she was 13. That camera ultimately saved her life and allowed her to document Jewish partisan activity later. As a result, she is one of the only known Jewish partisan photographers. Schulman's rare collection of images captures the camaraderie, horror, loss, bravery, and triumph of the rag-tag, resilient partisans—some Jewish, some not—who fought the Germans and their collaborators. Pictures of Resistance: The Wartime Photography of Jewish Partisan Faye Schulman, a compelling traveling exhibition produced by the Jewish Partisan Educational Foundation (JPEF) and curated by Jill Vexler, Ph. D, poses probing questions about this incredible woman and the people whose images she documented. Click HERE to see Alexa Welch Edlund's review of the exhibit in the Richmond Times Dispatch.

Free Educator Workshop: “Teaching About Partisan Resistance”

Virginia Holocaust Museum (VHM) 2000 East Cary Street, Richmond

The Virginia Holocaust Museum (VHM) and the Jewish Partisan Educational Foundation present “Teaching About Partisan Resistance.” Join us as Bruce Bramlett, from the Jewish Partisan Educational Foundation shares the history and stories of Jewish men and women who fought in organized, armed resistance groups throughout Europe, saving thousands and striking back at the Nazis and their collaborators. Learn the history, best practices, and resources to use in the classroom to help your students critically examine the topics of resistance, revenge, and ethics. Teaching with the film Defiance, the story of the Bielski brothers and women in the partisans, will be of particular focus during the workshop. This workshop is FREE for educators and includes: · Breakfast, Coffee, and Lunch · Educator guide, lesson plans and a special Defiance DVD with scenes suitable for classroom use · A certificate of attendance Travel Scholarships A limited number of scholarships are available for teachers 120+ miles from Richmond. Scholarships are to help cover travel, housing, and meals. Please contact Megan Ferenczy mferenczy@vaholocaust.org to apply. For more details or to register, click HERE!

MEMORIES OF IMPRISONMENT: Japanese American Incarceration During World War II

Virginia Holocaust Museum (VHM) 2000 East Cary Street, Richmond

Free Enrichment Program for Middle & High School Students March 15, 2023 | 10 am-12 noon At the Virginia Holocaust Museum Please join the Virginia Holocaust Museum for a conversation with Sam Mihara. Sam is a second-generation Japanese American, and at 9 years old he and his family were forced to move into an internment camp in northern Wyoming after the United States entered World War II. They would live crowded in a single 20 x 20 square foot room for the next 3 years. Today, as one of the very few surviving prisoners who speaks nationally about this dark time in our history, Sam shares poignant personal memories of events from 80 years ago that have continued to resonate through the decades. Sam’s presentation will give students the opportunity to hear how discrimination affected his life. Audience members will have the opportunity to ask Sam questions after his presentation. This program is free and open to middle and high school students. Space is limited register today! Download the Program Flyer!

Educator Workshop: Teaching About Japanese American Internment During World War II

Choral Synagogue Auditorium 2000 East Cary Street, Richmond, VA

Virginia Holocaust Museum Registration Deadline:  March 9, 2023 The Virginia Holocaust Museum and The Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation present “Teaching About Japanese American Internment During World War II.” Join us as Shirley Ann Higuchi, chair of The Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation, shares the history and stories of people that were imprisoned during World War II because of their Japanese ancestry. We will examine how incarceration was the result of decades of racism and discrimination in the United States and not just a reaction to the attack on Pearl Harbor. Learn the history, best practices, and resources to use in the classroom to help your students critically examine the lessons from this dark chapter in American History. FREE Educator Workshop Includes: Breakfast, Coffee & Lunch Educational Resources Copy of “Setsuko's Secret: Heart Mountain and the Legacy of the Japanese American Incarceration” Certificate of Attendance Travel Scholarships: A limited number of scholarships are available for teachers 120+ miles from Richmond. Scholarships are to help cover travel, housing, and meals. Please contact Megan Ferenczy at mferenczy@vaholocaust.org to apply. Click HERE to Download Workshop Flyer or to Register!

Public Program at Congregation Or Ami

Congregation Or Ami 9400 Huguenot Road, Richmond, VA

Pink Triangle Legacies: Coming Out in the Shadow of the Holocaust Sunday, March 19, 2023 | 2 pm Congregation Or Ami, 9400 Huguenot Road, Richmond, VA  23235

Educator Workshop | Let The World Know: Teaching about the Nazis’ LGBTQ+ Victims

Virginia Holocaust Museum (VHM) 2000 East Cary Street, Richmond

Join Virginia Holocaust Museum and Diversity Richmond for this workshop led by Dr. W. Jake Newsome Public Historian of the LGBTQ+ Past and author of the newly released book Pink Triangle Legacies: Coming Out in the Shadow of the Holocaust, as we discuss common questions, challenges, and opportunities when teaching about the Nazi persecution of LGBTQ+ people. Topics include terminology, how to integrate this theme into the overarching narrative of Holocaust history, and the power of individual stories. Educators will receive an overview of the latest historical research on the topic and new educational resources, including a lesson plan, bibliography, and a copy of “Pink Triangle Legacies: Coming Out in the Shadow of the Holocaust.” This workshop is free for educators and includes: • Breakfast, Coffee, and Lunch • Educator Resources and a copy of “Pink Triangle Legacies: Coming Out in the Shadow of the Holocaust” • A certificate of attendance Travel Scholarships A limited number of scholarships are available for teachers 120+ miles from Richmond. Scholarships are to help cover travel, housing, and meals. Please contact Megan Ferenczy mferenczy@vaholocaust.org to apply. About Dr. Newsome: Dr. Jake Newsome is an award-winning scholar of German and American LGBTQ+ history whose research and resources educate global audiences. His new book Pink Triangle Legacies: Coming Out in the Shadow of the Holocaust (Cornell University Press) tells the dynamic and inspiring history of the LGBTQ+ community’s original pride symbol. It traces the transformation of the pink triangle from a Nazi concentration camp badge into a widespread emblem of queer liberation, pride, and community. The Lambda Literary Foundation recently named Pink Triangle Legacies as one of its most anticipated new LGBTQIA+ books of 2022. Click HERE to Learn More or To Register!  

Upcoming Featured Exhibit: Halt! Remembering the Holocaust | Artwork by G. Roy Levin

Virginia Holocaust Museum (VHM) 2000 East Cary Street, Richmond

Halt! Remembering the Holocaust Artwork by G. Roy Levin The use of boxes/crates as the medium is meant to remind the viewer of the railroad box cars. The wood is literally trash -- broken, cracked, could fall apart -- adds to the meaning of images which are about a vision of people as disposable as trash. While serving on the faculty of Goddard College in 1980, G. Roy Levin received a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities which resulted in a book containing interviews with documentary filmmakers. Through this research, he came upon the documentary Shoah directed by Claude Lanzmann. He began to create artwork based on images from the film using various mediums. Levin started with paintings in color using discarded fruit and vegetable crates with wire and unframed canvases. He eventually switched to black and white photographs on boxes, reminiscent of the railroad cars that carried passengers to the concentration camps. The light in his paintings has a shimmering quality so that remembering becomes an “act of empathy and compassion for the unspeakable pain that was endured by so many.” Levin wanted his paintings to not necessarily show what the Holocaust was like, but to stimulate the viewer’s imagination to think about what it was like.  

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